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Biography #2 (for Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull)

Steven Spielberg is a three-time Academy Award winner, having earned two Oscars for Best Director and Best Picture for Schindler's List and a third Oscar for Best Director for Saving Private Ryan. He has also received Best Director Oscar nominations for Munich, E.T.: The Extra-Terrestrial, Raiders of the Lost Ark and Close Encounters of the Third Kind.

In 1994, Spielberg's internationally lauded Schindler's List emerged as the year's most honored film, receiving a total of seven Oscars, including the aforementioned nods for Best Picture and Best Director. The film also collected Best Picture awards from many of the major critics' organizations, in addition to seven BAFTA Awards, including two for Spielberg. He also won the Golden Globe Award and received a Directors Guild of America (DGA) Award.

Spielberg's critically acclaimed World War II drama Saving Private Ryan starring Tom Hanks, was the highest-grossing release (domestically) of 1998. The film also won five Oscars, including the one for Spielberg as Best Director, two Golden Globe Awards for Best Picture (Drama) and Best Director, and numerous critics' groups awards for Best Picture and Best Director. In addition, Spielberg won a DGA Award and a Producers Guild of America (PGA) Award. That year, the PGA also presented Spielberg with the prestigious Milestone Award for his historic contribution to the motion picture industry.

Spielberg won his first DGA Award for The Color Purple and also earned DGA Award nominations for E.T.: The Extra-Terrestrial, Raiders of the Lost Ark, Close Encounters of the Third Kind, Empire of the Sun, Jaws, Amistad and Munich. With 10 in all, Spielberg has received more DGA Award nominations than any director in history and, in 2000, he received the DGA's Lifetime Achievement Award. He is also the recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Film Institute, the prestigious Irving G. Thalberg Award from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, and the Kennedy Center Honor.

For television, on the heels of Saving Private Ryan, Spielberg and Tom Hanks executive-produced the miniseries Band of Brothers for HBO and DreamWorks Television. Based on the book of the same name by the late Stephen Ambrose, the fact-based World War II project won both Emmy and Golden Globe Awards for Best Miniseries. Spielberg and Hanks are currently in development on The Pacific, a World War II miniseries focusing on the battles in the Pacific theatre.

Spielberg won another Emmy Award for Outstanding Miniseries for Steven Spielberg Presents Taken, a SciFi Channel drama about alien abduction, which he executive produced. He is currently developing another miniseries to air on the SciFi Channel called Nine Lives. Also for television, Spielberg executive-produced Into the West, an original limited series Western which aired on the TNT cable network. Amblin Entertainment produced, with Warner Bros. Television, the award-winning, groundbreaking series E.R., which begins its 15th season on NBC this fall.

Born in Cincinnati, Ohio, Spielberg was raised in the suburbs of Haddonfield, New Jersey and Scottsdale, Arizona. He started making amateur films while still in his teens, later studying film at California State University, Long Beach. In 1969, his 22-minute short Amblin' was shown at the Atlanta Film Festival, which led to a deal with Universal, making him the youngest director ever to be signed to a long-term deal with a major Hollywood studio. Four years later, he directed the suspenseful telefilm Duel, which garnered both critical and audience attention. He made his feature film directorial debut on The Sugarland Express from a screenplay he co-wrote. In addition to the aforementioned films, his earlier film credits as a director include Always and Hook.

In 2006, Spielberg produced, with Clint Eastwood and Rob Lorenz, Flags of Our Fathers and Letters from Iwo Jima, the latter of which earned four Oscar nominations, including Best Picture. The dual films, directed by Eastwood, explored the battle of Iwo Jima from American and Japanese perspectives.

In 2005, Spielberg directed two films: War of the Worlds starring Tom Cruise and Dakota Fanning, and Munich starring Eric Bana, Daniel Craig and Geoffrey Rush, which earned five Academy Award nominations, including Best Picture and Best Director for Spielberg. Spielberg's other recent films include Catch Me If You Can starring Leonardo DiCaprio and Tom Hanks, the futuristic thriller Minority Report starring Cruise, and The Terminal starring Hanks. He also wrote, directed and produced A.I.: Artificial Intelligence, which was realized from the vision of the late Stanley Kubrick. In 2000, Spielberg won the Stanley Kubrick Britannia Award for Excellence in Film, presented by BAFTA - Los Angeles.

In 1984, Spielberg formed his own production company, Amblin Entertainment. Under the Amblin banner, he has served as a producer or executive producer on more than a dozen films, including such successes as Gremlins, The Goonies, Back to the Future and its two sequels, Who Framed Roger Rabbit, An American Tail, The Land Before Time, The Flintstones, Casper, Twister, The Mask of Zorro, Men in Black and Men in Black II.

In October 1994, Spielberg partnered with Jeffrey Katzenberg and David Geffen to form the new studio DreamWorks SKG, which was sold to Paramount Pictures in early 2006. Under their leadership, the studio has enjoyed critical and commercial success, and has been responsible for some of the most honored films in recent years, including three consecutive Best Picture Academy Award winners: American Beauty, Gladiator and A Beautiful Mind (the latter two co-productions with Universal), and the recent blockbuster TRANSFORMERS.

Spielberg has also devoted his time and resources to many philanthropic causes. The impact of his experience making Schindler's List led him to establish the Righteous Persons Foundation using all his profits from the film. He also founded Survivors of the Shoah Visual History Foundation (now the USC Shoah Foundation Institute for Visual History and Education), which has recorded more than 50,000 Holocaust survivor testimonies.

In addition, Spielberg executive produced The Last Days, the Shoah Foundation's third documentary, which won the Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature. He is also the Chairman Emeritus of the Starbright Foundation, which combines the efforts of pediatric health care, technology and entertainment to empower seriously ill children.

Bio courtesy Paramount for "Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull" (19-May-2008)


Biography #3 (for Letters from Iwo Jima)

Steven Spielberg is a principal partner of DreamWorks Studios, which he co-founded with Jeffrey Katzenberg and David Geffen in October 1994 and which was sold to Paramount Pictures in early 2006. Under their leadership, DreamWorks has enjoyed critical and commercial success, and has been responsible for some of the most honored films in recent years, including three consecutive Best Picture Academy Award winners: American Beauty, Gladiator and A Beautiful Mind (the latter two co-productions with Universal).

One of the industry's most successful and influential filmmakers, Spielberg has directed, produced, or executive produced some of the top-grossing films of all time, including Jurassic Park and E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial. Among his myriad honors, he is a three-time Academy Award winner, earning two Oscars for Best Director and Best Picture for Schindler's List, and a third Oscar for Best Director for Saving Private Ryan.

A DreamWorks/Paramount co-production, the critically acclaimed World War II drama Saving Private Ryan, starring Tom Hanks, was the highest-grossing release (domestically) of 1998. It was also one of the year's most honored films, earning five Oscars, including the one for Spielberg as Best Director, as well as two Golden Globe Awards for Best Picture (Drama) and Best Director. Spielberg was also recognized by his peers with a Directors Guild of America Award, and shared with the film's other producers in the Producers Guild of America's Darryl F. Zanuck Award for Theatrical Motion Picture Producer of the Year. That year, the PGA also presented Spielberg with the prestigious Milestone Award for his historic contribution to the film industry.

Saving Private Ryan also won Best Picture honors from the New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Toronto, British and Broadcast Film Critics Associations, with the Los Angeles, Toronto and Broadcast Film Critics also naming Spielberg Best Director.

In 1994, Spielberg won two Academy Awards, for Best Director and Best Picture, for the internationally lauded Schindler's List, which received a total of seven Oscars. The film also collected Best Picture honors from the major critics organizations, in addition to seven BAFTA Awards, including two for Spielberg. He also won the Golden Globe Award and received his second DGA Award.

Spielberg won his first DGA Award for his work on The Color Purple. He has also been honored with Academy Award nominations for Best Director for Munich, E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial, Raiders of the Lost Ark and Close Encounters of the Third Kind. Additionally, he earned DGA Award nominations for those films, as well as Empire of the Sun, Jaws and Amistad. With ten in all, Spielberg has received more DGA Award nominations than any director in history, and, in 2000, he received the DGA's Lifetime Achievement Award. He is also the recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Film Institute and the prestigious Irving G. Thalberg Award from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

In 2005, Spielberg directed two films-War of the Worlds and Munich-and was a producer on Memoirs of a Geisha. War of the Worlds starred Tom Cruise and was a contemporary retelling of H.G. Wells' classic futuristic novel. Munich, a historical thriller set in the aftermath of the 1972 massacre of 11 Israeli athletes at the Munich Olympics, earned five Academy Award nominations, including Best Picture and Best Director for Spielberg. The Universal/DreamWorks co-production starred Eric Bana, Daniel Craig, and Geoffrey Rush. Memoirs of a Geisha, directed by Rob Marshall and based on the best-selling book by Arthur Golden, won three Oscars for Best Cinematography, Art Direction and Costume Design. Spielberg's other recent films include The Terminal, starring Tom Hanks and Catherine Zeta-Jones, and Catch Me If You Can, starring Leonardo DiCaprio and Tom Hanks. Spielberg also wrote, directed and produced A.I.: Artificial Intelligence, which was realized from the vision of the late Stanley Kubrick. In 2000, Spielberg won the Stanley Kubrick Britannia Award for Excellence in Film, presented by BAFTA - Los Angeles.

Born on December 18, 1946, in Cincinnati, Ohio, Spielberg was raised in the suburbs of Haddonfield, New Jersey and Scottsdale, Arizona. He started making amateur films while still in his teens, later studying film at California State University, Long Beach. In 1969, his 22-minute short, Amblin, was shown at the Atlanta Film Festival, which led to his becoming the youngest director ever to be signed to a long-term deal with a major Hollywood studio.

Four years later, he directed the suspenseful telefilm Duel, which garnered both critical and audience attention. He made his feature film directorial debut on The Sugarland Express, from a screenplay he co-wrote. His other earlier film credits as director include Always, Hook, and the Raiders of the Lost Ark sequels Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom and Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade.

In 1984, Spielberg formed his own production company, Amblin Entertainment. Under the Amblin banner, he has served as producer or executive producer on more than a dozen films, including such successes as Gremlins, Goonies, Back to the Future I, II, and III, Who Framed Roger Rabbit?, An American Tail, The Land Before Time, The Flintstones, Casper, Twister, The Mask of Zorro, Men in Black and Men in Black II. Amblin Entertainment also produces the hit series ER.

Spielberg's other TV endeavors include executive producing with Tom Hanks the award-winning miniseries Band of Brothers, for HBO and DreamWorks Television. Based on the book of the same name by the late Stephen Ambrose, the fact-based World War II project won both Emmy and Golden Globe Awards for Best Miniseries. Also an Emmy winner for Best Miniseries was 2002's Taken, which Spielberg executive produced for DreamWorks Television and The Sci-Fi Channel. In 2005, Spielberg and DreamWorks Television partnered with TNT to executive produce the 12-hour limited series Into the West, which followed two multi-generational American and Native American families with each telling the dramatic stories of the development of the West from their distinct points of view. Coming in 2007 is On the Lot, an unscripted series which will allow aspiring director/filmmakers to vie for a studio development deal at DreamWorks. On the Lot is produced by Mark Burnett Productions, DreamWorks Television and Amblin Television. The reality series, which will air on Fox, was created by Spielberg and Mark Burnett, who will also serve as executive producers.

Spielberg has also devoted his time and resources to many philanthropic causes. The impact of his experience making Schindler's List led him to establish the Righteous Persons Foundation, using all his profits from the film. He also founded Survivors of the Shoah Visual History Foundation, which has recorded more than 52,000 Holocaust survivor testimonies. Spielberg executive produced The Last Days, the Shoah Foundation's third documentary, which won the Academy Award in 1999 for Best Documentary Feature. In 2005, the Foundation's repository of testimonies was transferred to the University of Southern California. The new USC Shoah Foundation Institute for Visual History and Education will be dedicated to research and scholarship in the humanities and social sciences. In addition, Spielberg is the chairman emeritus of the Starlight Starbright Children's Foundation, which combines the efforts of pediatric health care, technology and entertainment to empower seriously ill children.

Bio courtesy Warner Bros. for "Letters from Iwo Jima" (10-Feb-2007)


Biography #4

Steven Allan Spielberg KBE (born on December 18, 1946 in Cincinnati, Ohio) is a Jewish American film director whose films range from science fiction to historical drama to horror. He is noted for the patriotism of his work and, in recent years, for his willingness to tackle controversial issues. One consistent theme in his work is the abuse of others, whether it is a father abusing his children (physically or verbally) or a government agency abusing an entire class of people.

The director, the man

Spielberg is arguably the most financially successful motion picture director of all time. He has helmed an astounding number of feature films that have become enormous box-office hits, and this has given him enormous influence in Hollywood. As of 2004, he has been listed in Premiere and other magazines as the most powerful and influential figure in the motion picture industry. He is seen as a figure who has the influence, financial resources, and acceptance of Hollywood studio authorities to make any movie he wants to make, be it a mainstream action-adventure movie (Jurassic Park) or a three-hour-long black and white drama about a controversial historical subject (Schindler's List). This position makes many other filmmakers envious.

His beginnings

Spielberg is known by film historians as one of the famous movie brats of the 1970s: along with fellow filmmakers (and personal friends) George Lucas, Francis Ford Coppola, Martin Scorsese, and Brian De Palma, Spielberg grew up making movies. He was making amateur 8mm adventure movies with his friends as a teenager (scenes from these amateur films have been included on the DVD edition of Saving Private Ryan), and he made his first short film for theatrical release, Amblin', in 1968 at the age of eighteen. (Spielberg's own production company, Amblin Entertainment, was named after this short film.) His maiden directorial work was a segment of the pilot film to Rod Serling's Night Gallery. After directing episodes of various TV shows, including some early Columbo TV movies, Spielberg directed his first well-known feature with a 1971 TV movie-of-the-week entitled Duel (later released to theatres overseas and eventually in the U.S.). This film, about a truck mysteriously terrorizing an average citizen, has become a cult classic, having been released on video several times over the years.

Move to theatrical films

Spielberg's debut theatrical feature film, The Sugarland Express, (about a husband and wife attempting to escape the law) won him critical praise and enough studio backing to be chosen as the director of a summer movie that would secure him a place in the history of motion pictures: Jaws, a horror film based on the Peter Benchley novel about encounters with a killer shark. Jaws won four Academy Awards (for editing and sound), and grossed over US$100 million at the box office, the record as of that time.

In 1976, Spielberg was asked by Alexander Salkind to direct Superman, but decided instead to expand on a pet project he had on his mind since his youth: a film about UFOs, which became Close Encounters Of The Third Kind (1977). The film remains a cult sci-fi classic among its fans.

The success Spielberg was beginning to enjoy, as well as his eventual tendency to make films with wide mainstream and commercial appeal, also subjected him to disdain in critical circles by film reviewers. For example, Spielberg's next film was 1941, a big-budgeted World War II comedy farce set in L.A. days after the attack on Pearl Harbor, with the two top stars from Saturday Night Live, Dan Aykroyd and John Belushi, along with other all-stars. Although the film did make a small profit, it is considered by some to be Spielberg's first flop. An expanded version has been shown on network television and later on LaserDisc and DVD.

Spielberg at his pinnacle

But Spielberg's greatest film work was still to come, beginning in the 1980s. In 1981, Spielberg teamed up for the first time with his friend George Lucas to make Raiders of the Lost Ark, his homage to the cliffhanger serials of the Golden Age of Hollywood, with Harrison Ford (whom Lucas directed in Star Wars) as the dashing hero Indiana Jones. Raiders itself spawned two sequels, also directed by Spielberg and executive produced by Lucas.

One year later, Spielberg returned to his alien visitors motif with E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial, a Disney-inspired story of a boy and the alien whom he befriends (and is trying to get back home to outer space). E.T. went on to become the top-grossing film of all time for many years.

When E.T. was released, Steven Spielberg, a Porsche 928 aficionado, had his car's moon-roof button re-designed with the movie's logo as both a gag for passengers, and a tribute to the movie's success.

Despite their enormous appeal, few film scholars and critics place such Spielberg films as Raiders or E.T. in the same class as The Godfather, Citizen Kane, or many other classics of the cinema. Several of Spielberg's more serious works, such as Empire of the Sun and The Color Purple, have been seen as attempts to cast himself as a legitimate maker of serious motion pictures.

Although nominated throughout his career for an Academy Award, the gold statuette had long eluded Spielberg, although in 1986 he was awarded The Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award for his work up to that point.

Spielberg had tried numerous times to film a live-action version of Peter Pan without success. He eventually decided to create his own take on the Pan legend in 1991. Hook focused on a middle-aged Pan (played by Robin Williams), who returns to Neverland to face the title character (Captain Hook, played by Dustin Hoffman). The over-budget film was not a box-office success.

In 1993, Spielberg decided to once again tackle the adventure genre, as he released the movie version of Michael Crichton's novel Jurassic Park, about killer dinosaurs rampaging through an amusement park on a tropical island. It would eventually overtake E.T. as the all-time top grossing film for several years (until James Cameron's remake of Titanic).

It was in that same year that Spielberg finally won the critical acclaim he had long sought for making Schindler's List (based on a novel about a man who sacrificed everything to save thousands of people from the wrath of the Holocaust). That film earned him his first regular Academy Award for Best Director (it also won Best Picture).

Spielberg's fall and rise

In 2001, Spielberg filmed fellow director and friend Stanley Kubrick's final project, A.I.: Artificial Intelligence, a project that had been planned for many years but which Kubrick was unable to finish during his lifetime. The futuristic story of a human android longing for love, A.I. featured groundbreaking visual effects, but unfortunately was not the blockbuster film Spielberg had hoped for. The film drew mixed reviews.

In recent years, Spielberg has experienced a resurgence in popularity with Minority Report (2002), starring Tom Cruise as a futuristic cop on the run from his own future; and Catch Me If You Can (also in 2002), a story about a con-man (with Leonardo di Caprio and Tom Hanks). Spielberg used Hanks again in 2004 for The Terminal, the story of an East European immigrant living in an airport terminal.

As of 2004, he has won two Academy Awards for Best Director, one for Schindler's List and another for Saving Private Ryan.

In August 2004, Spielberg's newest project, a modernized adaptation of War of the Worlds was greenlit. Production started in October of this year and is currently set for release on June 29, 2005. This movie will also feature Tom Cruise in a leading role. Industrial Light and Magic (ILM) will work on special effects.

Article text released under CC-BY-SA. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Steven Spielberg" (13-Jan-2005)


Biography #5 (for The Terminal)

Steven Spielberg is a three-time Academy Award winner, earning two Oscars for Best Director and Best Picture for Schindler's List, and a third Oscar for Best Director for Saving Private Ryan. He has also received Best Director Oscar nominations for E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial, Raiders of the Lost Ark and Close Encounters of the Third Kind.

In 1994, Spielberg's internationally lauded Schindler's List emerged as the year's most honored film, receiving a total of seven Oscars, including the aforementioned nods for Best Picture and Best Director. The film also collected Best Picture awards from many of the major critics organizations, in addition to seven BAFTA Awards, including two for Spielberg. He also won the Golden Globe Award and received a Directors Guild of America (DGA) Award.

Spielberg's critically acclaimed World War II drama Saving Private Ryan, starring Tom Hanks, was the highest-grossing release (domestically) of 1998. The film also won five Oscars, including the one for Spielberg as Best Director, two Golden Globe Awards for Best Picture (Drama) and Best Director, and numerous critics groups awards for Best Picture and Best Director. In addition, Spielberg won a DGA Award and a Producers Guild of America (PGA) Award. That year, the PGA also presented Spielberg with the prestigious Milestone Award for his historic contribution to the motion picture industry.

Spielberg won his first DGA Award for The Color Purple and also earned DGA Award nominations for E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial, Raiders of the Lost Ark, Close Encounters of the Third Kind, Empire of the Sun, Jaws and Amistad. With nine in all, Spielberg has received more DGA Award nominations than any director in history and, in 2000, he received the DGA's Lifetime Achievement Award. He is also the recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Film Institute and the prestigious Irving G. Thalberg Award from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. More recently, Spielberg was presented with the Lifetime Achievement Award from Italy's David Di Donatello Committee.

For television, on the heels of Saving Private Ryan, Spielberg and Tom Hanks executive produced the miniseries Band of Brothers for HBO and DreamWorks Television. Based on the book of the same name by the late Stephen Ambrose, the fact-based World War II project won both Emmy and Golden Globe Awards for Best Miniseries. Spielberg and Hanks are currently in development on an as-yet-untitled World War II miniseries, focusing on the battles in the Pacific theatre.

Last year, Spielberg won another Emmy Award for Outstanding Miniseries for Steven Spielberg Presents Taken, a Sci Fi Channel drama about alien abduction, which he executive produced. He is currently developing another miniseries to air on the Sci Fi Channel called Nine Lives. Also for television, Spielberg is currently executive producing Into the West, an original limited series Western to air next year on the TNT cable network.

Born in Cincinnati, Ohio, Spielberg was raised in the suburbs of Haddonfield, New Jersey and Scottsdale, Arizona. He started making amateur films while still in his teens, later studying film at California State University, Long Beach. In 1969, his 22-minute short Amblin was shown at the Atlanta Film Festival, which led to a deal with Universal, making him the youngest director ever to be signed to a long-term deal with a major Hollywood studio.

Four years later, he directed the suspenseful telefilm Duel, which garnered both critical and audience attention. He made his feature film directorial debut on The Sugarland Express from a screenplay he co-wrote. In addition to the aforementioned films, his earlier film credits as a director include Always, Hook, and the Raiders of the Lost Ark sequels Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom and Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade.

Spielberg's more recent films include Catch Me If You Can, starring Leonardo DiCaprio and Tom Hanks, and the futuristic thriller Minority Report, starring Tom Cruise. He also wrote, directed and produced A.I. Artificial Intelligence, which was realized from the vision of the late Stanley Kubrick. In 2000, Spielberg won the Stanley Kubrick Brittania Award for Excellence in Film, presented by BAFTA - Los Angeles.

In 1984, Spielberg formed his own production company, Amblin Entertainment. Under the Amblin banner, he has served as a producer or executive producer on more than a dozen films, including such successes as Gremlins, The Goonies, Back to the Future I, II, and III, Who Framed Roger Rabbit, An American Tail, The Land Before Time, The Flintstones, Casper, Twister, The Mask of Zorro, Men in Black and Men in Black II. Amblin Entertainment also produces the hit series ER with Warner Bros. Television.

In October 1994, Spielberg partnered with Jeffrey Katzenberg and David Geffen to form the new studio DreamWorks SKG. Since then, the studio's successes have included three consecutive Best Picture Oscars for American Beauty, Gladiator and A Beautiful Mind, the latter two in partnership with Universal.

Spielberg has also devoted his time and resources to many philanthropic causes. The impact of his experience making Schindler's List led him to establish the Righteous Persons Foundation using all his profits from the film. He also founded Survivors of the Shoah Visual History Foundation, which has recorded more than 50,000 Holocaust survivor testimonies. In addition, Spielberg executive produced The Last Days, the Shoah Foundation's third documentary, which won the Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature. He is also the Chairman Emeritus of the Starbright Foundation, which combines the efforts of pediatric health care, technology and entertainment to empower seriously ill children.

Bio courtesy DreamWorks for "The Terminal" (17-Jun-2004)


Biography #6 (for Catch Me If You Can)

Steven Spielberg has directed, produced, or executive produced eight of the thirty top-grossing films of all time, including Jurassic Park and E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial. Among his myriad honors, he is a three-time Academy Award winner, earning two Oscars for Best Director and Best Picture for Schindler's List, and a third Oscar for Best Director for Saving Private Ryan. He has also received Academy Award nominations for Best Director for E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial, Raiders of the Lost Ark and Close Encounters of the Third Kind.

Spielberg's critically acclaimed World War II drama Saving Private Ryan, starring Tom Hanks, was the highest-grossing release (domestically) of 1998. The film also won five Oscars, including the one for Spielberg as Best Director, as well as two Golden Globe Awards for Best Picture (Drama) and Best Director. In addition, Spielberg was recognized by his peers with a Directors Guild of America (DGA) Award, and shared with the film's other producers in the Producers Guild of America (PGA) Award. That year, the PGA also presented Spielberg with the prestigious Milestone Award for his historic contribution to the motion picture industry.

Saving Private Ryan also won Best Picture honors from the New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Toronto, British and Broadcast Film Critics Associations, with the Los Angeles, Toronto and Broadcast Film Critics also naming Spielberg Best Director.

On the heels of Saving Private Ryan, Spielberg and Hanks executive produced the miniseries Band of Brothers for HBO and DreamWorks Television. Based on the book of the same name by the late Stephen Ambrose, the fact-based World War II project recently won both Emmy and Golden Globe Awards for Best Miniseries.

In 1994, Spielberg's internationally lauded Schindler's List was the year's most honored film, receiving a total of seven Oscars , including the aforementioned nods for Best Picture and Best Director. The film also collected Best Picture honors from many of the major critics organizations, in addition to seven BAFTA Awards, including two for Spielberg. He also won the Golden Globe Award and received his second DGA Award.

Spielberg won his first DGA Award for his work on The Color Purple and earned DGA Award nominations for E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial, Raiders of the Lost Ark, Close Encounters of the Third Kind, Empire of the Sun, Jaws and Amistad. With nine in all, Spielberg has received more DGA Award nominations than any director in history, and, in 2000, he received the DGA's Lifetime Achievement Award. He is also the recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Film Institute and the prestigious Irving G. Thalberg Award from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

Born in Cincinnati, Ohio, Spielberg was raised in the suburbs of Haddonfield, New Jersey and Scottsdale, Arizona. He started making amateur films while still in his teens, later studying film at California State University, Long Beach. In 1969, his 22-minute short Amblin was shown at the Atlanta Film Festival, which led to a deal with Universal, making him the youngest director ever to be signed to a long-term deal with a major Hollywood studio.

Four years later, he directed the suspenseful telefilm Duel, which garnered both critical and audience attention. He made his feature film directorial debut on The Sugarland Express from a screenplay he co-wrote. His other earlier film credits as director include Always, Hook, and the Raiders of the Lost Ark sequels Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom and Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade.

Spielberg's more recent films include the futuristic thriller Minority Report, starring Tom Cruise, and he also wrote, directed and produced A.I. Artificial Intelligence, which was realized from the vision of the late Stanley Kubrick. In 2000, Spielberg won the Stanley Kubrick Brittania Award for Excellence in Film, presented by BAFTA - Los Angeles.

In 1984, Spielberg formed his own production company, Amblin Entertainment. Under the Amblin banner, he has served as producer or executive producer on more than a dozen films, including such successes as Gremlins, The Goonies, Back to the Future I, II, and III, Who Framed Roger Rabbit, An American Tail, The Land Before Time, The Flintstones, Casper, Twister, The Mask of Zorro, Men in Black and Men in Black II. Amblin Entertainment also produces the hit series ER with Warner Bros. TV.

In October 1994, Spielberg partnered with Jeffrey Katzenberg and David Geffen to form the new studio DreamWorks SKG. Since then, the studio's successes have included three consecutive Best Picture Oscars for American Beauty, Gladiator and A Beautiful Mind, the latter two in partnership with Universal.

Spielberg has also devoted his time and resources to many philanthropic causes. The impact of his experience making Schindler's List led him to establish the Righteous Persons Foundation using all his profits from the film. He also founded Survivors of the Shoah Visual History Foundation, which has recorded more than 50,000 Holocaust survivor testimonies. In addition, Spielberg executive produced The Last Days, the Shoah Foundation's third documentary, which won the Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature. He is also the chairman of the Starbright Foundation, which combines the efforts of pediatric health care, technology and entertainment to empower seriously ill children.

Bio courtesy DreamWorks for "Catch Me If You Can" (01-Jan-2000)


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