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Biography #2 (for The Weather Man)

Michael Caine has been in over ninety motion pictures and has been nominated for six Academy Awards including Alfie, Sleuth, Educating Rita and The Quiet American. The highly lauded thespian won Best Supporting Actor Oscars for his performances in Hannah and Her Sisters and The Cider House Rules.

Caine's other honors include the New York Critics' Best Actor Award for Alfie, a Golden Globe Best Actor Award and a BAFTA Award (the British equivalent of an Oscar) for Educating Rita, a Golden Globe for Best Actor in a Comedy or Musical for Dirty Rotten Scoundrels and a Golden Globe for Best Actor in a Comedy or Musical for Little Voice.

Caine was born in South London and had a childhood fascination with cinema. Leaving school at sixteen, he worked in numerous menial jobs until National Service with the Royal Fusiliers took him to Korea. Upon his discharge, his first job in the theater was as assistant stage manager in Horsham, Sussex. When he returned to London, he acted with Joan Littlewood's Theater Workshop and played a minor role in the film A Hill In Korea while obtaining bit parts in other movies and walk-on roles in a couple of West End plays.

Eventually touring Britain with one repertory company after another, he developed a relaxed stage presence and perfected a vast range of accents. Starting out as an understudy in the role of Private Bamforth in the London stage hit The Long and the Short and the Tall, Caine ended up taking over the part when O'Toole dropped out and toured the provinces for six months. Following this stint, his television and film parts grew more substantial. The turning point in his film career came in 1963, when he landed the part of aristocratic Lieutenant Gonville Bromhead in Zulu. Passing forever out of the ranks of anonymity, he next played Harry Palmer in the espionage thriller, The Ipcress File which exceeded all expectations at the box office.

In 1966, Alfie catapulted Caine to super-stardom. In the annual British film critics' poll it was voted Best Picture of the Year. It also gave him his first Academy Award nomination. In the late sixties, he appeared in Gambit, Funeral In Berlin, Billion Dollar Brain, Hurry Sundown, Woman Times Seven, Deadfall, The Italian Job, The Battle of Britain, Too Late The Hero and The Last Valley. During the seventies he starred in X, Y and Zee, Pulp, Sleuth, The Wilby Conspiracy, The Romantic Englishwoman, The Man Who Would Be King, Harry & Walter Go To New York, California Suite and The Swarm.

In the eighties, Caine starred in Dressed To Kill, Victory, The Hand, Death Trap, Educating Rita, Blame It On Rio, The Holcroft Covenant, Hannah And Her Sisters, Sweet Liberty and Dirty Rotten Scoundrels.

In 1992, he and American producer Martin Bregman formed M & M Productions to make films in Britain for Caine to star in or direct. Their first production was Blue Ice, costarring Sean Young and directed by Russell Mulcahy.

Caine is also an author. He wrote an autobiography, What's It All About?, as well as Acting on Film, a book based on a highly successful series of lectures he gave on BBC Television. Caine most recently appeared in this summer's releases Batman Begins and Bewitched.

In 2000, Queen Elizabeth II honored Michael Caine with knighthood. Born Maurice Micklewhite, he is now officially known as Sir Michael Caine.

Bio courtesy Paramount for "The Weather Man" (18-Dec-2005)


Biography #3 (for Around the Bend)

Michael Caine will next star in three films: Miss Congeniality Two; as Alfred, Batman's butler, in Batman Begins, and a remake of his 1972 film Sleuth, with Jude Law.

Although 2004 will be a busy year, the year 2000 may have been the highlight of Michael Caine's life. Not only did he receive his second Oscar for the film The Cider House Rules, but he was honored by Queen Elizabeth II with a knighthood. Thus from being born Maurice Micklewhite he is now Sir Michael Caine.

Michael Caine's versatility as a major international star has shown itself in over 80 motion pictures, earning him the New York Critics Best Actor award for Alfie, a Golden Globe Best Actor Award for Educating Rita and a British Academy Award for Educating Rita, a Golden Globe for Best actor in a comedy for Little Voice and five Academy Award nominations for Alfie, Sleuth, Educating Rita, culminating in Oscars for Best Supporting Actor in Hannah and Her Sisters and The Cider House Rules.

The release of three wildly different films splendidly demonstrates his range: the harassed theater director in the comedy Noises Off, an ex-M16 hit man in the romantic thriller, Blue Ice, and a singing Scrooge with Miss Piggy, Kermit and company in the musical The Muppet Christmas Carol.

Although Caine has made his mark as an outstanding actor, it should be noted that he is also an author with the publication of his autobiography What's It All About? together with a definitive Acting on Film book based on the highly successful series of lectures he gave on BBC television.

Michael Caine was born in South London on March 14. His father was a Billingsgate Fish Market porter and his mother a charwoman. They were very poor, living in a gas-lit, two room flat until the Blitz forced his evacuation with his younger brother Stanley, to the safety of a farm in Norfolk. After the war, when he was 12, the family moved into a prefab in London's East End. A childhood fascination for cinema, an insatiable hunger for novels, frequent visits to the gallery of the Old Vic Theater, performances in school plays and a taste of directing drama in a youth club all stimulated his imagination and belief that he would one day be an actor.

He refused to accept his family expectation that he become a fish porter. Leaving school at 16, he worked in numerous menial jobs until National Service with the Royal Fusiliers took him to Korea. On his discharge, he spent his days in manual work but used his evenings to study acting. His first job in the theater was as assistant stage manager in Horsham, Sussex and was soon able to move to the Lowestoft Repertory Theater in Suffolk as a juvenile lead. Here he married the leading lady, Patricia Haines, but they parted after two years. Now deceased, Haines bore him a daughter Dominique (known as Nikki, with whom he enjoys a close relationship).

Self-confidence and a name change to Michael Caine (his nickname plus one word from The Caine Mutiny) which caught his eye on a cinema marquee encouraged him to move to London where he acted with Joan Littlewood's Theater Workshop. He played a minor role in the film A Hill In Korea and obtained bit parts in other movies and walk-on roles in a couple of West End plays, but it was not enough to live on.

Taking a gamble, he moved to Paris, where for several months he eked out a bare existence. Returning to London and with cash borrowed from his mother, he pursued acting full time. Touring Britain with one repertory company after another, he developed a relaxed stage presence and perfected a vast range of accents. In the next five years, he played more than 100 television dramas and became a familiar but nameless face to millions. They were threadbare years shared with flatmates Terence Stamp and composer John Barry.

He went on to understudy Peter O'Toole in the role of private Bamforth in the London stage hit, The Long, The Short and the Tall, and when O'Toole dropped out, Caine took over the part and toured the provinces for six months. Following this, his television and film parts grew more substantial.

The turning point in his film career came at the age of 30 in 1963 when he was given the role of effete, aristocratic Lieutenant Gonville Bromhead in the Joseph E. Levine production Zulu. The part was written as a complete ass, but he played it straight down the line as a man who was weak but at least thought he was strong. He turned this supporting role in to a starring one and, in the opinion of the critics, stole the show. Passing forever out of the ranks of anonymity, he next played Harry Palmer, hip but plodding antihero of the espionage thriller, The Ipcress File which exceeded all expectations at the box office. His lowkey acting style was again lauded by the critics.

Alfie in 1966 catapulted him to superstardom playing a womanizing Cockney wastrel with innocence and impudent humor. In the annual British film critics' poll, it was voted Best Picture of the Year. Alfie also gave him his first Academy Award nomination and the New York Critics prize for Best Actor.

In the late '60s he completed Gambit with Shirley Maclaine, Funeral in Berlin, Billion Dollar Brain, Hurry Sundown directed by Otto Preminger, Woman Three Times Seven for Vittoria De Sica, Deadfall, The Italian Job, and The Battle of Britain. He took a starring role in Robert Aldrich's Too Late The Hero and immediately went into The Last Valley for James Clavell.

During the '70s he starred with Elizabeth Taylor in X, Y and Zee, with Mickey Rooney and Lizabeth Scott in Pulp, Laurence Olivier in Sleuth, for which he was awarded his second Academy Award nomination, Sidney Poitier in The Wilby Conspiracy, Glenda Jackson in The Romantic Englishwoman, Sean Connery in The Man Who Would Be King, James Caan and Elliott Gould in Harry and Walter go to New York, Maggie Smith in California Suite, and with Henry Fonda, Olivia de Havilland and Richard Widmark in The Swarm.

He made 21 films in the '80s, including Dressed to Kill (directed by Brian de Palma), Victory (John Huston), The Hand (Oliver Stone), Death Trap (Sidney Lumet), "Educating Rita (Lewis Gilbert; for which he won a Golden Globe Award for Best Actor and received his third Academy Award nomination), Blame It On Rio (Stanley Donen), The Holcroft Covenant (John Frankenheimer), Hannah and Her Sisters (Woody Allen, winning the Oscar for Best Supporting Actor), Sweet Liberty (Alan Alda) and Dirty Rotten Scoundrels (Frank Oz, for which he was awarded a Golden Globe for Best Actor in a Comedy).

He returned to television for the first time in over 20 years in 1986 to star in the four-hour miniseries Jack The Ripper which in Britain received the highest ratings ever for a drama.

With his partner-leading American producer Martin Bregman in 1992 he formed a film production company, M & M productions to make films in Britain to be directed by or starring Michael Caine. Their first production was Blue Ice, costarring Sean Young and directed by Russell Mulcahy.

In the 1992 Queen's Birthday Honors, he was awarded the CBE. Eight years later he was created a Knight Bachelor, making him Sir Michael Caine. His autobiography, What's it all About? was published by Turtle Bay Books in November 1992.

A former restaurateur, Caine was co owner in London of Langan's Brasserie, Langan's Bistro, Odin's and The Canteen in Chelsea Harbor. His first American venture was a tropical brasserie located in South Beach in Miami, Fl. He married Shakira Baksh, a Guyana born beauty who was a runner up in the Miss Universe pageant on January 8, 1973. They are the parents of two daughters, Nikki and Natasha.

Bio courtesy Warner Independent for "Around the Bend" (03-Jan-2005)


Biography #4 (for Secondhand Lions)

2000 was a momentous year for Michael Caine. Not only did he receive his second Oscar for Best Supporting Actor for his performance in the film The Cider House Rules, but also Queen Elizabeth II honored the legendary actor as a Knight Bachelor, bestowing upon him the title of Sir Michael Caine.

His versatility as a major international star can be seen in over 80 motion pictures. His work has earned him numerous accolades including two Academy Awards for Best Supporting Actor for Hannah and her Sisters and The Cider House Rules; the New York Critics' Best Actor Award for Alfie; a Golden Globe Award and a British Academy Award for Educating Rita; two Golden Globe Awards for Dirty Rotten Scoundrels and Little Voice; as well as four Academy Award nominations for Alfie, Sleuth, Educating Rita and The Quiet American.

Some of his most recent films are Austin Powers in Goldmember, The Quiet American, Last Orders, Miss Congeniality, Quills and Get Carter. Other movies that illustrate his unique talent and range are The Muppets Christmas Carol, Noises Off, Mr. Destiny, The Fourth Protocol, Mona Lisa, Half Moon Street, Deathtrap, Dressed to Kill, California Suite, A Bridge Too Far, The Eagle Has Landed, The Man Who Would Be King, Pulp, Funeral in Berlin and Gambit, to name but a few.

Caine was born in South London. During childhood he developed a fascination for the cinema and an insatiable hunger for novels. He performed in school plays and even directed dramas in a youth club. After leaving school at 16 and a stint in Korea, he landed his first job in the theatre as an assistant stage manager. All the while he studied acting. After several years in repertory theatre and in small parts on television, Caine landed an understudy role to Peter O'Toole as Private Bamforth in the London stage hit, The Long, The Short and The Tall. When O'Toole dropped out of the play, Caine took over the part and toured the country for six months, after which, his roles in television and film grew substantially.

The turning point in his career came in 1963 when he won the role of Lt. Gonville Bromhead in Joseph E. Levine's production, Zulu. His supporting role stole the show for critics and audiences alike. Next he played Harry Palmer in the sleeper hit, The Ipcress File. By 1966 Alfie catapulted him to super-stardom, with the British film critics voting the movie Best Picture of the Year, Caine's Oscar nomination and his award from the New York Film Critics.

In 1986 he returned to television for the first time in over 20 years to star in the four-hour miniseries Jack the Ripper which, in Britain, received the highest ratings ever for a drama.

With his partner, producer Martin Bregman, he formed M&M Productions in order to make films in Britain in which Caine could star or direct if he chose. Their first production, released in 1992, was Blue Ice, costarring Sean Young and directed by Russell Mulcahy.

Michael Caine's autobiography, What's It All About?, was published by Turtle Bay Books in November 1992.

He recently completed filming in Ireland Neil Jordan's The Actors, directed by Conor McPherson. He also recently completed filming The Statement which was directed by Norma Jewison and made in France.

Bio courtesy New Line Cinema for "Secondhand Lions" (01-Jan-2000)


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